Glow On Your Babymoon

Glow On Your Babymoon photo: @indrabogie
photo: @indrabogie

February – the depth of winter. The cold weather pushes many of us into vacation mode and this is why February is often called cruise season. It’s also the perfect time for a Babymoon!

Interestingly enough, the term Babymoon was originally coined by Sheila Kitzinger in her 1996 book The Year after Childbirth. She referred to it as family time with mom, dad and new baby. Now the concept has evolved and Babymoon is defined in the Oxford dictionary as “a relaxing or romantic holiday taken by parents-to-be before their baby is born.’’

There is a lot of advice on the web on how to plan your babymoon. The expertise that we can offer is how to dress while on vacation:

Signature Floral Wrap Dress - Carry
Sophia Floral Wrap Dress – Carry

 

 

 

The perfect date starts with a feminine dress. A floral wrap dress with vintage blooms is as radiant for a romantic dinner as it is for a walk on the beach.

 

 

 

 

Striped Maxi Tank Dress - Ripe Maternity
Striped Maxi Tank Dress – Ripe Maternity

 

 

 

 

The striped maxi – easy to wear with strappy heels or sandals, this resort favourite will take you from the poolside to dinner under the stars.

 

 

 

 

 

Chambray Cuffed Shirtdress - Jules & Jim
Chambray Cuffed Shirtdress – Jules & Jim

 

 

 

 

The denim tunic, paired with leggings and runners. An effortless look for strolling, whether you’re discovering the city or admiring the local scenery.

 

 

 

 

 

Whether you go to a exotic resort or choose to explore your hometown, cherishing these moments of heightened intimacy is an important part of your pregnancy. Take this as an opportunity to prepare for the next adventure that you are taking together. Go on your Babymoon and fall in love all over again!

Carry Maternity is Made in Canada

Stitched into each piece of Carry Maternity’s house line is small reminder of its origin, something that owner and designer Pat Gillespie views with quiet satisfaction. They may not stand out, but tiny ‘Made in Canada’ tags set the shop’s signature items in stark contrast to the myriad brands whose offshore practices are so controversial.

As fast fashion lines have become ever more ubiquitous on the streets, the quality of both their products and their ethics have come into question, so for Pat, keeping her line’s production local was an easy decision on several fronts.

“To start, we can be really responsive to what we see customers asking for, and the turnaround time is very quick,” she says. “I can produce something within two to three weeks.”

That means that when inspiration strikes, Pat is in a position to see her vision through from start to finish, on a shortened timeline. Once her designs are drawn up, she can have a hand in their execution at the Toronto factory where her garments are created.

“I can supervise the pattern making process, the fittings – everything is done with me involved,” Pat says. “I have a long history with the manufacturing house that I deal with. I’m confident of their quality, standards, and their work conditions.”

And her ‘Made in Canada’ policy ensures that the items her customers ultimately take home are exceptional, since each design is only produced as part of a small run.

“Because we produce locally, we can do small quantities,” Pat explains. “So when I choose a print, it’s not a mass production piece. It’s unique, but you’re not paying a premium for it.”

Her desire to keep her production in Canada has a moral undercurrent as well as those practical ones. Carry Maternity’s concern with community extends to Pat’s business practices, and she has no interest in outsourcing production to places where the industry has had a detrimental effect on other societies.

“I think people really do care about where their clothing comes from,” she adds. “We’re aboutcommunity, and about family health, so it really follows through that we also want to be sure that our clothing is made in an ethical way.”