Celebrities Expecting in 2017

Celebrities Expecting in 2017

2017, the year of the Rooster brings loyalty, commitment, hard work, family values, and top-notch appearances as just some of the characteristics that will be rewarded this year. Another reward that follows with 2017 is the birth of new babies and we have the scoop on the latest celebrities expecting in 2017!

 

Lauren Conrad – The star of the reality series The Hills and fashion designer, posted back in January with a sonogram on her Instagram “Happy New Year! I have a feeling 2017 is going to be the best year yet . . .”. Lauren and husband William Tell have been married since 2014 and this will be the first child for the couple.

 

Amal Clooney – The 39 year old human rights lawyer and activist looked stunning while showing off her bump with husband George Clooney in Paris at the Cesar Awards. After weeks of speculation Julie Chen, host of The Talk, made the announcement on her February 9th show that the couple is having twins: “Beyoncé is not the only superstar expecting twins. Congratulations are in order for George and Amal Clooney!”

 

Amanda Seyfried – The actress is expecting her first child with fiancé Thomas Sadoski. People reported that Seyfried confirmed the news at a Givenchy press launch on November 29, where she showed off her baby bump in a sheer minidress. The couple got engaged back in September and we are thrilled for their expectant news!

 

Whitney-Eve Port – The reality co-star of the The Hills announced in February on her Instagram “Oh hey! Just standing by the window in my underwear, with a BABY in my belly! DM me if you know what I’m supposed to do with this thing for how ever many years I’m supposed to be in charge.” Husband Tim Rosenman  and Whitney have been married since November. Are we seeing future besties between Whitney’s and Lauren’s babies…?

 

Rosie Huntington-Whiteley – The 29 year old model posed in a bikini and held her baby bump in the announcement on her Instagram with the caption, “Very happy to share that Jason and I are expecting!! Lots of love Rosie x ????? Photo by @jasonstatham.” This will be the first child for Rosie and Jason, who have been together since 2010.

 

Laura Prepon – The Orange Is the New Black and former That ’70s Show star, is expecting her first child with fiancé Ben Foster. The announcement came in January, a few months after the announcement of their engagement back in October.

 

Ciara – The singer announced on Instagram back in October with a beautiful picture of her and husband Russel Wilson that they are expecting their first child together. Ciara also has a 2 year old son with her former husband Future.

 

Beyoncé and husband Jay-Z are having their second and third bundles of joy this year! The announcement was made in February on Beyonce’s Instagram with a beautiful maternity shot of her. We are sure that Blue Ivy is thrilled to be a big sister and we cannot wait for their arrival.

 

Stay tuned for an upcoming post on how to get the look of our featured celebrities expecting in 2017!

Cold weather is coming – what are your options for staying cosy?

Being pregnant can have its challenges, but how to keep warm in chilly (or downright frigid) weather does not have to be one of them. Maternity designers have created coats that you can wear throughout pregnancy and after. Or if you already have a favourite winter coat, some innovative Canadian companies have have come up with products that will extend your coat to keep you cosy throughout your pregnancy

Winter coats: the investment piece

black-mcoat
The MCoat

The MCoat 

The Mcoat was one of the first winter coats developed for pregnant women. This coat, insulated with pure Canadian down, is popular because of its adaptability. A zip out triangular panel  faces down when you are pregnant and is flipped over for baby carrying, and then can be removed completely. The MCoat can be worn for years to come.

modern-eternity-3-in-1-parka
Modern Eternity 3-in-1 Parka

Modern Eternity

This 3-in-1 maternity coat by Modern Eternity is a casual, cotton twill parka that is down filled and water resistant. Popular for its extended length and weekend styling, this coat is great for being outdoors and active. The removable panel means that it is easily worn for maternity, baby carrying and after.


Coat panels: the practical solution

Make My Belly Fit

Make My Belly Fit

The BellyFit coat extender uses the zippers on your existing coat and their patented panel to create space where you need it most. It has a sleek look that features snaps along the panel so that you can tailor your coat both during pregnancy and for baby carrying. Their zipper is the most commonly used one by outwear manufacturers (like Canada Goose) so that it will fit into as many coats as possible. If your coat features a different zip, worry not! There are 16 zipper adapters available that will match the BellyFit to your coat. The panel is made with two layers of windproof/water repellent outerwear material with a layer of cosy microfleece in between.

small_grey_pregnancy_grande-btb
Bridge the Bump

Bridge the Bump

This coat extender system also comes in two lengths which allows you to choose the fit and style you want for your coat. Snaps and an adjustable belt create an empire waist or show-off-your-bump look. The Bridge the Bump system is made with a water repellent/windproof outerwear material and quilted microfibre insulation. And of course, the insert can be worn for baby carrying as well. Panel colours are specifically chosen to match Canada Goose coats.

 

With this range of practical options, you and your baby bump will be warm and cozy this winter. Come by the store or give us a call and we will help you figure out the coat solution that’s best for you.

Share the Warmth Coat Drive 2016

jessies-logo

As I write this, it definitely does not feel like fall. But, before you know it, the chilly weather will become a daily routine. And if the meteorologists are on track, the fall chill is going to quickly give way to a very cold winter. Many of us are lucky and have a choice of coats to wear through the varying levels of cold a Canadian winter brings.

Some young mothers are not fortunate enough to have one coat, much less a choice of which one to wear. It has become an October tradition for us here at Carry Maternity to collect coats for the Swap Shop at Jessie’s – The June Callwood Centre for Young Women. Jessie’s Centre provides much needed services to empower pregnant teenagers, young parents and their children. Attendance in their programs is high throughout most of the year, but it drops with cold temperatures. Young moms want to get to Jessie’s Centre but accessing services can be difficult without appropriate outerwear.

Our Share the Warmth coat drive will run through Sunday, November 14th. You can donate gently-used, clean women’s coats (both maternity and non-maternity) as well as coats for children under 5 years old. In addition to your coat donations, Carry Maternity will donate 5% of our fall coat sales to the Well Woman and Well Baby Clinic. We hope that our Share the Warmth campaign will support young women to access all the incredible programs that Jessie’s Centre offers.

As a thank you for your coat donation, we will give you $10 Baby Bonus credit, which you can use for anything you’ll need for delivery or after. And if you need to find a coat for yourself, our Fall Coat Sale is on until Sunday, October 30th. You’ll get 15% off beautiful and practical winter coats from MCoat, Modern Eternity, Seraphine and Noppies. We also carry coat panels from Make My Belly Fit and Bridge the Bump (coming soon).

With gratitude for your help,

Pat, Sarah, Kshama, Kavya and Kat
The Carry Maternity Team

Holiday Gift Guide 2014

Holiday Gift Guide 2014

An expectant mother often forgets to stop and pamper herself. So, if there’s a special mom-to-be on your shopping list this holiday season, save the baby gifts for next year, and treat her to something that’s all about her. Whether she’s in her first trimester or the final countdown, she’s sure to appreciate a bit of indulgence. In that spirit, we’ve pulled together a gift guide to help you find just the right thing to spoil the mom-to-be this holiday season.

$50 and under: the Stocking Stuffer gift

Skip Hop Grab & Go stroller organizer $25, Bella Band $35, Mama Mio Pregnancy Essentials kit $49, Shupeas baby shoes $35, Blueberry Hill baby hats $18-$35

 

$100 and under: the BFF gift

Mamalicious Blazer $89, Mamalicious Sparkly Dress $69, Elari diaper wallet $65, Blanqi support tank $85, Mamalicious denim $79, Isabella Oliver scoop neck top $75, Bola necklace $85

 

$150 and under: the Under-the-Tree gift

Carry Sweater dress $149, Queen Mum sweater $169, Boob panty/nursing bra set, Skip Hop Chelsea diaper bag $125, Cache Coeur Lisa Nursing Nightgown $110

 

The Splurge gift

Mayana Genevière bra $90, Carry Ruched dress $149, MamaMio package: Boob Tube, Lucky Legs,Tummy Rub Butter $137, Paige denim, gift card, Mcoat $379

Craving

They’re among the most unusual and (sometimes) dreaded side effects of pregnancy, and once one of them grabs hold, it can be impossible to shake. Cravings, both run of the mill and cringe-worthy, are as mysterious as they are varied, leading some women to pine for strange snacks and leaving others with no unusual hankerings.

In the past, there was no shortage of theories surrounding what cravings for certain foods might mean. One popular old wives’ tale led mothers-to-be that the sweet tooth they developed during pregnancy meant that they’d give birth to a girl.

Today, those beliefs have been widely discarded, even as cravings continue to be an issue for women. Although those cravings are as diverse as the women who have them, there are some that are particularly common, including salty snacks like chips, fries and pickles, and treats like ice cream. One sweet item that always tops lists of most-craved items, though, is chocolate.

It may seem obvious (who needs to be pregnant to long for chocolate?), but the rich confection perennially tops lists of the treats most sought-after by expecting women. Some practitioners of alternative medicine believe that cravings for chocolate might be triggered by a shortage of magnesium, which you can normally find in whole grains, nuts and seeds, and leafy green vegetables.

However, nutritional experts are divided in their opinions on the meaning of women’s pregnancy cravings – or if they have any meaning at all. Many believe that there’s no link between the foods women want, and what their body (or baby) actually needs.

That said, once a pregnant hears the siren call of chocolate-y treats, it can be hard to overcome. While nutritionists discourage women from caving to all of their impulses, sometimes the best way to combat cravings can be to indulge them once in a while.

At Chocolate Brunette, pastry chef Micol Corno knows just how satisfying a small treat – made with only the finest ingredients – can be. Each of her artfully crafted chocolate creations, from her Nutella-based, melt-in-your-mouth Heavenly Bite cookie, to her array of bite-sized truffles, is petite but packed with flavour. The result is a small, but satisfying answer to the chocolate cravings that so often plague soon-to-be mums.

Although absolutely decadent (Micol uses only high grade Belgian chocolate and an exceptional selection of nuts like cashews, pistachios, and hazelnuts), her products aren’t over-the-top. Micol eschews trendy toppings like buttercream, and opts instead for ganache and chocolate drizzles.

Whether you’re expecting, or simply have a desire for chocolate that you just can’t shake, Chocolate Brunette’s ever-changing assortment of freshly baked goods is an easy choice for anyone with a sweet tooth. And, with top of line coffee and espresso playing a supporting role to Micol’s chocolate-based creations, it’s also an ideal spot for new mums to recharge and re-caffeinate.

Clothes Worth Getting Pregnant For



Pat’s concept of Carry Maternity is to create a place where women can feel welcomed and at home. It’s her hope, she says, that the store will continue to be a social hub for women and mothers, whether they’re looking for jeans that work for their changing figures, or just a place to quickly pop in and breastfeed.

Guest Speakers for this event included, a pre and postnatal wellness introduction from Samantha at Core Expectations, Nadine from Mayana Genevière introduced her high luxe intimate maternity undergarments.
In addition to the craving stations Chocolate Brunette Pastry Company provided a fantastic array of cupcakes and truffles. The beautiful evening was captured in natural lighting by Adriana Villela of ÜmlaPhoto.

 

SUPPORT, IT MAKES A WORLD OF A DIFFERENCE.

When I was pregnant with my first child Graham, I was a busy entrepreneur.  My business partner and I were both pregnant at the same time and only five years into building an international design company specializing in maternity wear.   We were only able to take 8 weeks off each and then were back to work with babies in tow.

At the time, I was so busy and driven that I just accepted that I wasn’t part of any of the neighbourhood mummy groups.   Most of the time I was exhausted, but I was also thrilled will my new baby boy.

It was not until much later that I discovered what I had missed out on.  When I volunteered for school trips, I seemed to be out of the loop.  Most of the other mothers knew each other, but all my connections were work related, not within the neighbourhood.  The other mothers were not trying to exclude me, but they had become close through sharing their children’s milestones.

Finally, through a new friend in the neighbourhood, I joined a mothers’ group.  I felt out of place at first, but I soon forged the kind of friendships that come from within a small community and shared experiences.

It was like I’d discovered a whole new world where I didn’t have to figure out everything on my own.  It was a safe haven to open up and share stories and wisdom and resources.  Mothering became easier.  Now if I need a plumber, a dentist, a last-minute babysitter or someone to feed the cat, it is just a phone call or text away.

I know those early years would have been much easier if I had found these connections earlier.  So I guess my one piece of advice for pregnant women is that, regardless of how long you are on maternity leave and what your plans are when it is over,  joining a mothers’ group is invaluable.  And if one doesn’t exist, start your own.  It doesn’t have to be large or sophisticated, just a place for support.

yummymummyclub.ca/blogs/tanya-enberg-unexpected-mother/20130131/8-reasons-why-joining-a-moms-group-is-a-must

And here are some places to find just the right mothers’ group for you:

mumnet.ca

moms.meetup.com

toronto.ca/health/parenting

Raising kids while fighting cancer? Check out gildasclubtoronto.org

OWNER OF CARRY MATERNITY SUPPORTS WOMEN BEYOND TORONTO’S CITY LIMITS

Work for Widows is a charity organization that is a product of a truly tragic disaster. In 2004, a Tsunami devastated numerous coastal communities of Sri Lanka. Many women were left to face an uncertain future as the tsunami left them widowed, homeless and without income as they struggled to care for their children. The heartbreaking story of one particular woman sparked Work for Widows founder, Pamela Porodo into action. While assisting to feed, clothe and offer medical assistance to the victims of the disaster, a Buddhist monk who managed a Moratuwa camp was concerned about one of the displaced survivors and introduced her to Pam. Pam met the young 23 year old woman who was 6 months pregnant and alone. She had lost her home, mother, father, husband and three year old child to the deadly wave. Without hope and what she deemed a bleak future ahead of her, she was stealing medication from other victims in the camp to end her life and that of her unborn child.

Many hours were spent with this young woman in order to convince her to hand over the medication in exchange for a promise that there was a way to support herself  and child.  With no plan set in place yet, Pam bought a bag of beads, some fishing line and showed the young woman how to make a simple necklace,  promising to return to the camp the next day to buy her jewellery. Upon return it was clear that word had spread as Pam was greeted by a small crowd of local women. It was upon this humble platform that the organization was established. Today, Work for Widows has supported over 180 widowed and abandoned women along with 362 children under the age of 18. The overarching aim is to empower impoverished and abandoned women in Sri Lanka by providing with them a means to earn a living while staying at home to care for and educate their children.

Owner of Carry Maternity, Pat Gillespie explains that their reason for stocking the jewellery stems from their personal mandate – Our family extends beyond our own walls. “We wanted to support an organization that is doing something positive for women. Work for Widows is a wonderful initiative and we are so proud to be an advocate”. Pat, who also knows somebody who has lost their life in a tsunami, says that it is very easy to feel for the women. “the destruction caused to people’s lives from disasters such as this is horrendous“. This organization is unique in that rather than just providing immediate relief and refuge, it lays the platform for women to be able to make a living and provides ongoing support in their endeavours.

By volunteering as an ambassador for the program, Pat Gillespie  shares the same proactive spirit with other entrepreneurial ambassadors like Amber MacJodi Faith, and One Tooth Activewear.

Each piece is very personalized and comes with a thank you message from its maker. Very reasonably priced, it is a great way to make a small contribution to the livelihood program supporting hundreds of women and children. To find out more about the efforts of Work for Widows, or browse their jewellery visit them online. Alternatively, you can find a range of handmade jewellery for sale at Carry Maternity in Toronto’s Yorkville.

Saying Goodbye to Harmful Chemicals at Carry Maternity

“It really started when I was a young mother, and I was facing an illness,” she says. “That really motivated a lot of changes, so a big part of my devotion to the store being a clean environment has to do with my own health, and the health of women.”

Although women are expected to drop unhealthy habits like drinking, smoking and even caffeine from their lifestyles, Patknows there are plenty of lesser known factors in our environments that can be just as damaging. Toxins in everything from beauty products to cleaning supplies can all be absorbed through women’s skin, which can be harmful for both soon-to-be mothers and their babies.

“The number one reason we wanted to do all natural is that we’re so much more informed today about pregnancy and our body, the vessel that carries the child, being a clean environment,” Pat says. “Some women actually even prepare before they get pregnant, and really clean up their act.”

Part of that, she says, is eschewing products that let of gases and chemicals that can have a negative effect on the body. In the Carry Maternity store, Pat says she and her staff are “returning to the origins of cleaning,” using basic, natural materials that our mothers and grandmothers might have used, like baking soda and vinegar.

Generally speaking, she says that the women who come into Carry Maternity are well informed, and eager to learn more about how to create healthier conditions for themselves during pregnancy.

“I think it’s natural that women are also looking at what they’re putting on their body, what they’re putting in their body, and what’s in their environment,” she says. “Women are pretty committed these days to not just parenting, but the process of being pregnant as well.”

Some of Pat’s favourite all-natural products include:

J.R. Watkins Naturals Window Cleaner – works on mirrors, windows, glass tabletops, without leaving streaks or residue.

Whip-It Premixed, Ready To Go Formula – plant-based multipurpose “supercleaner”, capable of breaking down tough stains while disinfecting.

Nutribiotic Grapefruit Seed Extract – one of nature’s powerful disinfectant, it can be diluted to use on hard surfaces instead of bleach.

Carry Maternity is Made in Canada

Stitched into each piece of Carry Maternity’s house line is small reminder of its origin, something that owner and designer Pat Gillespie views with quiet satisfaction. They may not stand out, but tiny ‘Made in Canada’ tags set the shop’s signature items in stark contrast to the myriad brands whose offshore practices are so controversial.

As fast fashion lines have become ever more ubiquitous on the streets, the quality of both their products and their ethics have come into question, so for Pat, keeping her line’s production local was an easy decision on several fronts.

“To start, we can be really responsive to what we see customers asking for, and the turnaround time is very quick,” she says. “I can produce something within two to three weeks.”

That means that when inspiration strikes, Pat is in a position to see her vision through from start to finish, on a shortened timeline. Once her designs are drawn up, she can have a hand in their execution at the Toronto factory where her garments are created.

“I can supervise the pattern making process, the fittings – everything is done with me involved,” Pat says. “I have a long history with the manufacturing house that I deal with. I’m confident of their quality, standards, and their work conditions.”

And her ‘Made in Canada’ policy ensures that the items her customers ultimately take home are exceptional, since each design is only produced as part of a small run.

“Because we produce locally, we can do small quantities,” Pat explains. “So when I choose a print, it’s not a mass production piece. It’s unique, but you’re not paying a premium for it.”

Her desire to keep her production in Canada has a moral undercurrent as well as those practical ones. Carry Maternity’s concern with community extends to Pat’s business practices, and she has no interest in outsourcing production to places where the industry has had a detrimental effect on other societies.

“I think people really do care about where their clothing comes from,” she adds. “We’re aboutcommunity, and about family health, so it really follows through that we also want to be sure that our clothing is made in an ethical way.”

Getting to Know Yorkville’s Carry Maternity

It takes a village to raise a child, and in an age when so many connections are forged digitally, Carry Maternity’s Pat Gillespie wants to bring back the personal touch that old adage suggests.

Located amid the bustle of one of Toronto’s most renowned neighbourhoods, Carry’s Yorkville location is a haven for expecting women and new mothers looking to connect with a maternal community – and, of course, top-of-the-line fashions to flatter their changing figures.

And Carry’s customers aren’t the only ones undergoing transformations – the store itself is in the final stage of transitioning from its former identity as Rhonda Maternity to a completely updated store and a host of new products. What hasn’t changed is the attention to detail and individual care that has attracted a loyal clientele for decades.

Here, Pat offers some insight on what customers, new and old, can expect following the redesign, her personal connection to the store, and how dressing during pregnancy can be more uplifting than stressful.

How important is your connection with your customers – both in the store, and when you design?

Pat Gillespie: Community is really important, because when you go into a maternity store, you’re often feeling vulnerable. In our society, we are so weird about women’s bodies – we’re spoon-fed this craziness about having to be a certain size, a certain shape, so when a woman starts to have any changes, even though they’re leading to a positive result, she’ll be freaked out a lot of the time.

In a store like ours, we really have to be trusted, and we have to be credible. Everybody on staff is extremely skilled at looking at somebody’s body type and understanding how to enhance it. So our customers come to know us really well, and we come to know them very well, and it’s a very natural process.

For 19 years, I designed and manufactured clothing and sold to retailers, and even though I’d worked on the maternity floor previously, I was away from the customer. I started to design more in a vacuum, and then you get very trend-focused and less about your customer. So, I think I was a good designer, but coming back to retail and actually being able to interact with the customers I’m selling to or designing for, has made a huge difference in improving me as a designer.

What can customers expect when they walk in the door at Carry Maternity?

We carry literally everything to do with the pregnancy lifestyle, from an undergarment to a pair of jeans. We have a fairly big focus on work, because it’s not an easy thing to locate. We’re pretty full service.

We’re going to embrace more community events, and we’re going to be more concerned about not just dressing someone beautifully and on budget, but also their wellbeing. We try and provide products that people can use with confidence, and not worry about chemicals that they’ve heard could cause problems for themselves or possibly for their baby.

Our store is a space where women know they can pop in and breastfeed if they need to – people tend to return and visit us. I think our instincts are very community-oriented. We want to be supportive of women – we’re women who are looking to help other women.